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Showing: 1-10 results of 2385

Distilling the ideas of the greatest military theoreticians of history, including Sun Tzu, Niccolò Machiavelli, and Carl von Clausewitz, Antulio J. Echevarria II presents a fascinating account of the "art of the general." Drawing on historical examples, from Hannibal's war against Rome to Napoleon's victory at Austerlitz, from the Allies' campaign to overwhelm Hitler's fortress to the terror attacks of September 11, Echevarria vividly describes the... more...

They were history's most famous and ferocious warriors. From the Huns to the Mongols, successive waves of nomadic horsemen swept out of the great steppes of Central Asia and wreaked havoc on the static civilizations of Europe, India, and China. How were they so successful? And, what were the limits of their powers? An esteemed professor--who specializes in Arabic and medieval studies--reveals just how "underdeveloped" societies spawned... more...

"An astute military historian's appraisal of what separates the sheep from the wolves in the great game of war."—Kirkus ReviewsIf a key to military victory is to "get there first with the most," the true test of the great general is to decide where "there" is—the enemy's Achilles heel. Here is a narrative account of decisive engagements that succeeded by brilliant strategy more than by direct force. The reader accompanies those who fought, from... more...

“The history of the sword,” the author writes in his introduction, “is the history of humanity.” For centuries, the sword has been a symbol of power, strength, liberty, and courage. In the Middle Ages, the image of a sword was used to signify the word of God. Nearly every culture in history has forged blades from stone or steel to fight in times of battle and protect in times of peace. In this groundbreaking work,... more...

Harold James Jenks practically grew up behind bars spending all of his teenage years in jails, reformatories and prisons. Jenks was not free until he was 24 years old-learned how to fight as a matter of survival. On the "outside" Jenks used knowledge acquired in prison for jobs managing unruly customers in nightclubs, etc.-getting upwards of $500 a day for occasional "trouble-shooting." In addition to knowledge acquired in prison Jenks dealt with knife... more...


Even the earliest weapon developers faced the need to understand how and why guns and ammunition work in order to improve their effectiveness. As weapons became more sophisticated, the field of ballistics naturally divided into three main areas of specialization: interior, exterior, and terminal ballistics. Providing unique coverage of all three areas, Ballistics: Theory and Design of Guns and Ammunition offers a seamless presentation of the complex... more...

The Spitfire is probably Britain's best loved and admired airplane. It is also revered around the world. This book looks at the later marques that were modified for various special tasks and differed to a large degree from Supermarine's first early versions that saw action in the early days of World War II. New and more powerful Rolls-Royce engines replaced the well-tried Merlin, but increased the aircrafts performance in terms of speed... more...

A complete compendium of the submarine badges of the world, dating from the Imperial Russian Naval Officers Submarine School Graduation Badge of 1909 to the new South Korean Submariners Badge issued in 1996. Covers all countries currently operating submarines as well as those no longer existing as political entities.

A useful book that deals with a number of psychological issues surfacing in military and paramilitary forces. Military Psychology: Concepts, Trends and Interventions offers various psychological theories that are not only significant in the context of soldiers but also help to strengthen the capability of military and paramilitary forces during combat and non-combat operations.  Stressing on the psycho-social well-being of the... more...

Submarines had a vital, if often unheralded, role in the superpower navies during the Cold War. Their crews carried out intelligence-collection operations, sought out and stood ready to destroy opposing submarines, and, from the early 1960s, threatened missile attacks on their adversary’s homeland, providing in many respects the most survivable nuclear deterrent of the Cold War. For both East and West, the modern submarine originated in German U-boat... more...